Burundi

Population: 8,749,000 (2013 estimate)
Location: Great Lakes Region, Eastern Africa

SV Statistics

There is a lack of data available currently regarding sexual violence in Burundi due to under reporting.

 

Conflict in Burundi

The Burundian civil war lasted from 1993 to 2005, but this war was the only the latest in a cycle of violent conflict within the country.  Civil unrest in Burundi had been on-going since it gained independence from Belgium in 1962 (Bundervoet et al, 2007:3-4).  The unrests were largely due to ethnic divides between the Hutu and Tutsi tribes.

The civil war of 1993-2005 is seen as having officially started with the assassination of Hutu president Melchior Ndadaye (Nillesen & Verwimp, 2010:8).  Burundian armed forces and different rebel groups were involved in the fighting and it affected the entire country (Bundervoet et al., 2007:5).  In 2005 peace was established with the swearing in of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

The fighting included different rebel groups which based themselves in forests and in neighbouring countries, launching attacks and then hiding again.  Sexual violence (SV) was rife throughout the war and has continued after peace was declared.

 

 

Population: 8,749,000 (2013 estimate)
Location: Great Lakes Region, Eastern Africa

SV Statistics

There is a lack of data available currently regarding sexual violence in Burundi due to under reporting.

 

Conflict in Burundi

The Burundian civil war lasted from 1993 to 2005, but this war was the only the latest in a cycle of violent conflict within the country.  Civil unrest in Burundi had been on-going since it gained independence from Belgium in 1962 (Bundervoet et al, 2007:3-4).  The unrests were largely due to ethnic divides between the Hutu and Tutsi tribes.

The civil war of 1993-2005 is seen as having officially started with the assassination of Hutu president Melchior Ndadaye (Nillesen & Verwimp, 2010:8).  Burundian armed forces and different rebel groups were involved in the fighting and it affected the entire country (Bundervoet et al., 2007:5).  In 2005 peace was established with the swearing in of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

The fighting included different rebel groups which based themselves in forests and in neighbouring countries, launching attacks and then hiding again.  Sexual violence (SV) was rife throughout the war and has continued after peace was declared.

 

 

What is the church doing?

In 2011, country level workshops brought together faith leaders, NGOs, UN agencies and individuals together to understand more about SV in Burundi and discuss and plan as to how faith communities could prevent and respond to the sexual violence at a local and national level.

In 2013, the Anglican province of Burundi started piloting community based programmes about sexual gender based violence in 10 churches and communities in Matana diocese, including:

  • training church and community facilitators to raise awareness of sexual violence in the community,
  • trainings church based counsellors who can provide emotional and psychological care for survivors of sexual violence,
  • mapping community stakeholders (police, schools, health clinics etc) and identifying existing services in the communities who support and care for survivors of sexual violence,
  • increasing knowledge of existing Burundi laws that protect women and children’s human rights.

National faith networks have also been mobilised and are working together to raise awareness about sexual and gender based violence and HIV during the 16 days of activism against gender based violence.

Latest news

Translate